Brain Cancer Survivor Stories

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Brain Cancer Fighter Shares Her Journey

brain cancer fighter

Favourite quote

“You are not alone”

Cathy Fischer was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2008. She is fighting her disease since last 10 years.

The Diagnosis

“2008 because of migraines I got an MRI, the migraines had nothing to with my brain tumor”

The Journey

brain cancer fighter's journey “In 2008 I had my very first MRI. After 2 years of very bad migraines. I went to get the MRI the MRI tech said your doctor didn’t order an MRI with a contrast, did I want it she asked I said yes. As soon as I was done with the MRI she said I needed to see my doctor asap. I went to a neurologist who said I might have the beginning stages of MS, a shadow, or a lesion. I left there and found a different neurologist. I was told that I had a glioma in my right front temporal lobe and I was going on the wait and watch plan where every 3 months I got an MRI. I was doing so well they said to get an MRI every 6 months and that’s when my tumor grew in 2011. The doctor said to biopsy the tumor. I decided to get another opinion. As I went up to meet the new neurologist my insurance company called me and said I was approved for surgery. I hadn’t met the doctor yet. That’s when I was told I had cancer I had never heard that from a doctor. The doctor wanted to cut me ear to ear to ear. I did not feel comfortable there. So I went to get another opinion. In 2011 I had my first surgery I had an astrocytoma grade 2. I am cut from the middle of my head to my ear. They couldn’t get all the tumor out they said I didn’t need chemo or radiation. I went on the wait and watch plan every 3 months. In 2014 the tumor grew again. It hadn’t grown enough for surgery. I went on chemo Temador. I finished my 9th round of chemo on Friday and Sunday I broke out head to toe with huge hives. I did a 10th round same thing happened. I am allergic to Temador the only thing I am allergic to. I went back on wait and watch. In 2016 my tumor grew again but not enough for surgery. So I did chemo again loumustine/CCNU, it messed with my blood count so I had to stop it. I went back to every 3 months wait and watch. On June 28th 2018 my tumor grew again this time a lot. I needed surgery again. July 17th I had my second surgery, they took out my astrocytoma but they found another tumor that did not show up on the MRI, a glioblastoma grade 4. I am now almost done with 30 treatments of radiation and I am doing immunotherapy every 3 weeks.”

Motivation to fight cancer

“To spread awareness, everyone’s story is different but also the same

Message to other cancer patients

message for cancer patients “You are not alone.”

9 Months Old Brain Cancer Survivor’s Amazing Journey

Benjamin Sanchez - brain cancer survivor

Favourite quote

“Childhood Cancer is a Big Fat Poopiehead.  #SlayCancerWithDragons”

Benjamin Sanchez was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2014. He was just 9 months old at that time. He has successfully defeated his disease.

The Diagnosis

2014 at just 9 months, Old Choroid Plexus Carcinoma Brain & Spinal cancer Grade 3. Benji was perfectly healthy never sick aside from a teething fever. The Weekend of Halloween he had Multiple Seizures, and we rushed Benji to the Hospital and within hours a Mass was confirmed. We met with a Neurosurgeon and 24 hours later Benji underwent 6 1/2 hr Brain Surgery. He almost lost his life 3 times on that OR Table. He pulled through and weeks later we found out the Cancer had spread and metastasized through his entire Spine.

The Journey

Benjamin Sanchez - brain cancer survivor journey Benji spent nearly 400 days in a Hospital, Brain surgery, 6 rounds of High Dose Chemo, 3 Stem cell transplants, 3 Central Line Procedures, 3 NG Tubes. Every first milestone was spent in a Hospital or Oncology Clinic, his first Birthday, Christmas, even his first Steps were taken in the hall of a Medical Environment. There was a point in time we were told to take Benji home and just keep him comfortable. We had maxed out of all chemo he could have. He did 3 transplants back to back with just a couple of weeks in between to recover.  His immunity was slowly declining and we needed a miracle. Thank God the third one did the trick.

Motivation to fight cancer

Just seeing Benji Thrive. We never had an easy day each round was just worse than he one before but our biggest motivation was the outpouring Love from Family, Friends & Social Media Family!

Biggest hindrance

“The fact that we were not seeing any change, not having answers, the Chemo was taking a toll and we didn’t know if it was indeed working. Every cycle had its own battles and today Benji is thriving but he is also dealing with a lot of side effects from the treatment. The life-saving treatment has caused delays and issues as far as airway disorders, damaged voice box, damaged teeth (missing 17), hearing loss, lung & respiratory issues, the list goes on.”

Message to other cancer patients

Benjamin Sanchez - brain cancer survivor “Take it one day at a time. Doctors can only give you statistics but children are so incredibly resistant. Every chemo journey is different and miracles do happen.”

Brain Cancer Survivor Now A Fitness Enthusiast And A Traveller

Brain Cancer Survivor Now A Fitness Enthusiast And A Traveller
“You can achieve anything you set your mind to.”
Jimmy M was diagnosed with brain cancer in May 2014. He has successfully defeated his disease. He is a fitness enthusiast and a traveller.

 

The Diagnosis

“May 2014. After some numbness while running a race I went to the doctor for some tests and the MRI found the tumor.”

 

The Journey

Brain Cancer Survivor Journey

“In mar 2014, I ran the Atlanta Spartan sprint and when I jumped over a wall at mile 3, the left side of my face and arm went completely numb. After shaking it off and walking for a few minutes, I finished the race. Two months and multiple medical tests later, on May 6, 2014, I was officially diagnosed with brain cancer.

The diagnosis changed my life and my outlook on life. I was dealing with a divorce before a second round of chemo and radiation, a move to a new city, and the uncertainty of raising a child alone. I caused some hardship to people I loved and also dealt with hardship from people I loved. I had to fight to get myself medically cleared to continue serving in the military.

There were many ups and downs but through all of that I maintained a positive attitude because at the end of the day I’m living with an inoperable tumor that “knock on wood” isn’t affecting me too bad and I get to live my life. I work, I serve my country, I’m a full time graduate student, and single dad. Cancer changed my life, in my opinion, for the better. It made me a stronger person with different perspective on life.”

Motivation to fight cancer

“My son and my family. I want to be around as long as possible to see my son grow to become a man.”

Biggest hindrance

“Fatigue, always being tired sucks when trying to get a lot done and uncertainty. Having nightmares of not waking up while a toddler is in the other room is tough.”

Message to other cancer patients

Brain Cancer Survivor message to other cancer patients
“Think positive, I’ve learned that thinking positive has attracted more positive people in my life which helps. Also, don’t let the cancer define you, you can do anything, you just might have to make minor adjustments to achieve your goals.”

9 Year Old Brain Cancer Survivor’s Mom Shares Her Journey

Caleb Scott - Brain Cancer Survivor
“All we’ve got is hope, and we hang on to that every single day.”
Caleb Scott was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2015.He has successfully defeated his disease. He was just 9 years old when he was diagnosed.

 

The Diagnosis

“Diagnosed in September 2015 following 6 weeks of illness. Vomiting most mornings, off in colour and just ‘not right’ A MRI was ordered which showed a mass on the cerebellum.”

 

The Journey

9 year old brain cancer survivor journey
“Caleb had surgery immediately to remove the tumour and that left Caleb with paralysis down the right hand side of his body and face. He had to learn to sit, stand and walk all over again. Radiation was really hard with having his head screwed to the table and unable to move and it left him very sick and unable to eat. Chemo was very hard on his body and he dropped to dangerous levels of weight and needed a feeding tube to help maintain what weight he had left. However after 6 weeks of radiation and 7 months of chemo, in July 2016, Caleb was able to ring the end of treatment bell. He remain cancer free today, almost 3 years since diagnosis.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“Caleb was 9 years old and has a whole lifetime in front of him. He has so much more to live for and we made sure he knew how much he was loved and wanted.”

 

Biggest hindrance

“Caleb’s weight and inability to eat was really hard combined with needing to use a wheelchair and being 5 hours from home.”

 

Message to other cancer patients

Caleb Scott fighting brain cancer
“Keep fighting!!! It’s not easy, it might end, be ‘kind’ but keep fighting.”

Mother Of 2 Years Old Brain Cancer Fighter Shares His Journey

“Family support is the biggest love on earth.”
Anton was diagnosed with brain cancer on 23rd March 2018. He is fighting his disease. He is just 2 years old.

 

The Diagnosis

“23rd of March this year. Anton was in hospital to get checked after month not knowing what was wrong with him. He was really thin, almost died of starvation. A lot of doctors and psychiatrists tried to figure out what kind of a sickness he has. After we got back to hospital again they wanted to make more check-ups. They did an ultrasound on his fontanelle and found a shadow. Right after that, they did an MRI and found this enormous tumor!”

 

The Journey

“It is a long journey (the beginning of the story I told you in the story how Anton found out). After that nobody really had a plan what to do… the doctors of oncology where confused cause this tumor was so giant but Anton didn’t have any other handicaps than not eating. The tumor was actually around his optic nerve but he was able to see everything. They said he is way too thin to do an operation or chemo right away. So he got a surgery for a venous access to get nutrients and fats through this. When he gained weight they did brain surgery to find out what kind of tumor it is. Everything went good and they found out the kind of the tumor: pilocytic astrocytoma. They decided to do chemo for 1.5 years and that’s the plan for now. They are not doing radio therapy because he is too young. In October they will do the next MRI to see what the chemo did for now. And now Anton’s has chemo once in a while and still has a problem to eat. He is doing okay he just pukes a lot. But he is a big fighter and is doing a good job.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“He is too young to tell us but we know that he wants to be with his family till he is a grandpa and he spreads good vibes all the time so he doesn’t want to leave us alone. I want mum and dad not to be afraid everyday”

 

Biggest hindrance

“The first 6 weeks I had to stay in hospital and w e were not allowed to go home at any time”

 

Message to other cancer patients

“Never lose your smile because it makes you and others to feel better.”

Brain Cancer Fighter Shares His Passion For Basketball

“Always be inspired on every trial you face for these are stepping stones for a higher purpose”
Juano Ocampo was diagnosed with brain cancer on June 8th, 2008. He is fighting his disease.

 

The Diagnosis and Journey

“I was rushed to the hospital on June 8th, 2008 with an intense headache, nausea and vomiting, body numbness and seizures. Symptoms started 6 months prior. First came the unbearable headaches that progressed rapidly each month then followed by nausea and vomiting then the last two were body numbness and seizures. As soon as we arrived at the hospital the doctors requested a CT scan to be done and the results confirmed that the CSF (Cerebra Spinal Fluids) was blocked by a huge mass in the area of the Pineal Gland. They immediately rushed me to emergency surgery for a temporary tube to be inserted inside my head to drain some of the fluids causing pressure to the brain stem. After surgery, I was admitted to the ICU where I stayed for 3 months. Immediately the day after surgery the doctor requested an MRI test. She then reported the news that I was diagnosed with Pineal Germinoma. The Doctors decided to perform another surgery for VP (Ventriculo-Peritoneal) shunt to be inserted at the right side of my body to drain the remaining fluids by urinating it. The surgery was a success but they also explained that surgically removing the tumor can’t be done because the tumor has now been fully attached to the optic nerve so if they remove it I would completely lose my vision. The only appropriate solution was chemotherapy and radiation. I underwent 4 cycles of chemo and after 2 cycles it was gone. My physician never suggested for me to take radiation treatment due to the permanent scarring in my brain. For months it seemed to work but when the following year came, around the last week of August of 2009 the MRI confirmed that it was back. It was a difficult thing to swallow especially for my family. The Doctors then devised a plan for me to undergo 3 cycles of even stronger doses of chemotherapy, PBSC (Peripheral Blood Stem Cell) Collection, Bone Marrow Transplant then Radiation Treatment. After 6 months of grueling treatments, the tumor was gone. My journey with cancer affected me both physically and emotionally especially my family who were most affected emotionally. Nothing can ever describe the grief that you see whenever seeing their eyes when they look at you going through each and every step of treatment.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“My biggest motivation against my battles with cancer was turning my tragic moments to become the inspiration for me to get back to my passion which is basketball. Believing that my tragic moments were the stepping stones for a higher purpose. Turning adversity to opportunity.”

 

Biggest hindrance

“The permanent disorder that the tumor caused called diabetes insipidus is my biggest hindrance. The kidney couldn’t retain the water fluids that’s why I need to urinate more often. Because of this, I am taking prescription medication for the rest of my life.”

 

Message to other cancer patients

“Don’t ever be discouraged during the times of trial and suffering for every experience leads to a greater purpose for all of you. Everything happens for a reason and whatever you may be going through these moments will make you stronger and inspires you to believe that nothings impossible.”

Brain Cancer Fighter Ask To Other Never Give Up

brain cancer patient sophie wardle
“The devil whispered in my ear, “You’re not strong enough to withstand the storm.” Today I whispered in the Devil’s ear, “I am the storm.””
Sophie Wardle was diagnosed with Brain cancer in March 2014 and then again in April 2018. She is fighting her disease.

 

The Diagnosis

“I was first diagnosed with a grade 2 low-grade brain tumour in March 2014. This changed to an aggressive grade 3 brain tumour April 2018”

 

The Journey

“My journey has been difficult knowing it was a forever diagnosis. My cancer caused epilepsy, so I dealt with seizures and had a lot of medication for that. I had my first craniotomy in March 2014 where I underwent 10 hours of brain surgery. After that, I went on to watch and wait where every 3 months I would receive a brain MRI to see if there had been any progression. All had been well up until April of 2018 where my brain tumour had changed to what is classed as highly aggressive and non-curative. I received another craniotomy in August which was awake brain surgery. I am now undergoing 6 weeks of radiotherapy and 12 months of chemotherapy. I’m just hoping I can get through all treatments”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“My children”

 

Biggest hindrance

“Being in the hospital, the travelling and the medication”

 

Message to other cancer patients

“Fight with everything you have and never give up”

Brain Cancer Fighter Blogs To Spread Awareness

“Rejoice rebuild the storm has passed” Frank turner the next storm. I even got it tattooed in the man’s handwriting to mark finishing treatment.
Ammy was diagnosed with brain cancer in November 2016. She is fighting her disease. She shares her journey on her blog to spread awareness.

 

The Diagnosis

She was diagnosed with brain cancer in November 2016.

 

The Journey

“I started getting ill in October of 2016 lots of headaches, missing lots of work, and being sick a lot. Towards the end of October I had spent 3 weeks bedbound, couldn’t eat or drink, constantly being sick, so I took myself to the doctor who ran blood tests showing a high white blood cell count. He said to come back in a couple weeks for a check-up. I was starting to feel better and my blood tests returned to normal. Then I woke up in the middle of the night about a week later in so much pain in my head I couldn’t move. I was taken by ambulance to the hospital. I had an MRI scan showing a tumor in my brain. I was then blue lighted to south mead hospital, Bristol, for surgery. A biopsy and debulking were done initially leading us to believe that the tumor was benign. I was asked to return a few weeks later for another debulking, but during the 3 weeks I spent at home, the tumor had almost completely grown back. So the initial debulking was repeated. It was then noticed my blood count was too low and I had a blood transfusion, sent to the ICU where again my blood count dropped and I had another blood transfusion. A week later it was discovered that I had cancer grade 3. Very quickly I was transferred to Bristol royal infirmary. I started 6 weeks of radio every day Monday to Friday. I also had chemo every day including weekends, I got a break from chemo for a week before I went back on to chemo every day for what should have been a year. Unfortunately, my platelet levels got too low and after 6 months my chemo was stopped, so future treatments are possible as not all the tumor can be removed. I now have scans every 4 months to keep an eye on things and I have been stable for almost 2 years.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“My biggest motivation is definitely my family and partner. I would and could do anything for them!”

 

Biggest hindrance

“I’d say my biggest hindrance is losing my job as I have had too much time off ill. I also can’t drive as it’s a brain tumor and I have a left sided weakness so wouldn’t be able to control a car. My social life has also suffered as I have a few bad days still and can’t leave the house”

 

Message to other cancer patients

“Do not listen to statistics, you are the king or queen of your own story. Statistically, I should have relapsed by a year to 18 months, and I’m still here fighting. You can do it too.

Brain Cancer Survivor Now An Author And Actress

“A lot of people tell me “you’re so lucky” after they hear my story. Well okay, first they say “OMG, I’m so sorry” and then they say “you’re so lucky.” But what is luck anyways? Would you have told me I was lucky three years ago when I was literally given a death sentence? Luck is defined as success or failure apparently brought by chance rather than through one’s own actions. In other words random. But I don’t think this was random…how could it be? That was when I decided to be in control of my “luck.” You are probably thinking “Grace, that’s not how it works.” But, why not? It’s your life. Make it that way.”
Grace Wethor was diagnosed with brain stem glioma at age of 13. She is the Author of #1 Best Selling book “You’re so lucky book”. She also is Teen Vogue “It Girl” and Nickelodeon Actress.

 

The Diagnosis

At age 13, Grace was diagnosed with a brain stem glioma (a tumor in the pons of the brain) by MRI.

 

The Journey

Grace’s journey has been a very different story then you are used to hearing. Due to the location of her tumor, it was classified as inoperable and chemotherapy/radiation had a slim chance of working. There is no medical treatment currently available for her tumor so she has been living life to the fullest for the past three years with it.

 

Motivation to fight cancer

Grace’s motivation to fight and do the things she does for the community comes from her building relationships and seeing her friends fight the same illness. From touring with her book to speaking at TED & Camp Mak-A-Dream, Grace’s main goal is to support others on their brain tumor journeys and hearing their stories is what motivates her to keep going.

 

Biggest hindrance

Grace’s biggest hindrance is differently the lack of medical treatment/knowledge for tumors in the brain stem. Due to the location, it is hard to biopsy or evaluate tumors in that region. Because of this, there has been a lot of guesses and assumptions about how the tumor will perform in the future.

 

Message to other cancer patients

“My message for other people currently fighting is to connect with the people around you. When I was first diagnosed, I remember feeling like I was the only one, and once I started projects such as “You’re So Lucky” & “We Can Beat This”, I realized it wasn’t true. So did the others involved in the projects! Get to know your fellow survivors because they are the only ones who truly understand what it’s like to fight this.”

Inspiring Story Of BMX Athlete Fighting 4 Brain Tumors

“I love saying ‘Fear is just a thought. Thoughts can be changed.’”

The Diagnosis

“I was diagnosed in 2010 after an MRI for checking a traumatic brain injury.” Josh Perry is an inspiration for other fighters as he achieved his goals despite living with 4 brain tumors presently. If he can do it, you can too!

 

The Journey

“I was diagnosed with a large brain tumor taking over half my brain, optic nerve, and artery in 2010. The complications of the surgery resulted in 2 growths again 2 years later that were treated with Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in 2012. They shrunk for 4 years and have become stabilized since. In 2017, I was diagnosed with 2 additional tumors on the right side of my brain. They suspect I have Neurofibromatosis, a genetic disorder that is causing them to appear. This 3rd diagnosis led me to a high-fat diet, also known as a ketogenic diet, and after a year follows up MRI, they showed no progression. I live with 4 tumors in my skull today.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“My biggest motivation to fight was/is my life vision and dream I created when I was younger and was currently/still living. To be a professional BMX athlete.”

 

The biggest hindrance

“The mental aspect was my largest hindrance along my journey. I have come a long way in learning that my mindset is responsible for most of the outcomes of my life, one way or another. When we learn that we can change our internal chemistry with our thoughts and actions in life, we can create the outcomes we focus on, good or bad. It’s tough to accept and practice, but it’s so worth it.”

 

Message to other fighters

“My message is to focus on exactly what you want in life, rather than what you don’t want. Optimism, faith, love, and a vision can do wonders for any hardship we face in life. Where our focus goes, energy flows. That’s an amazing and powerful quote that means so much to me, I watched my mom battle colon cancer for a decade with a smile on her face and a positive attitude saying “I know I will be fine and it’ll get better” and she is healthy and happy today. She had a desire to live her life and be there for her children and that’s where I learned a lot of what I practice and share today.”

Grade 3 Oligodendroglioma Brain Tumor Survivor Runs An Amazing Vegan Lifestyle Wedsite

“You should never regret anything in life. if it’s good, it’s wonderful. if it’s bad, it’s experience”
Jaime Hall was diagnosed with Grade 3 oligodendroglioma brain tumor on March,2017. She has successfully defeated her disease. She is a designer, writer, and co-founder of “Messy Veggies”. Let’s know more about her journey.

 

The Diagnosis

In March 2017, one night she had two grand mal seizures as she was going to bed. She consulted her doctor and on further investigations, they discovered a grade 3 oligodendroglioma brain tumour.

 

The Journey

After her diagnosis, She was given radiation therapy. Then she was started on chemotherapy shortly and her medical oncologist gave her a referral to Melbourne IVF for fertility preservation, as chemotherapy could cause infertility. She was given chemo in capsule form and she had to take it for 5 days in a row with water only. After 30 rounds of radiation therapy and 6 months of chemotherapy, her MRI scans were all clear.
 
In her own words- ”We also found out that you have to wait at least 6 months after finishing chemo before trying to have babies. It also required sign off from your oncologist and surgeon.” “I started noticing near the end of radiation that I was forgetting small things, my short-term memory is shocking and I am repeating stories. Seeing a smile starting to creep into people’s faces when telling them a story is a dead giveaway that they have heard this one before. It is embarrassing and I feel stupid.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“To be with my family and to make a family one day.”

 

Biggest hindrance

“Stopping work and memory loss.”

 

Message to other fighters

“Eat healthy, (plant based) and be positive.”

6 Years Old Brain Cancer Survivor’s Amazing Journey

brain cancer survivor story
“Just keeping swimming” -Dory
Ava McPhee was diagnosed with brain cancer in 2017. She has successfully defeated her disease. She was just 4 years old when she was diagnosed.
 
Ava had a scan again in December (2018) and that doctor told us that they can see the spot but it is still tiny and they believe that because it hasn’t grown, it must be scar tissue. We have noticed big improvements with Ava’s memory and energy the past few months. Children are such little troopers and we’re so proud of her.

 

The Diagnosis

“There were concerning symptoms such as we noticed that Ava seemed more forgetful and was sick a lot, but her health otherwise seemed perfect. She was only four and our doctor wasn’t too worried. We discovered her tumour when her left eye turned inward. We rushed to the optometrist who rushed us to a specialist at the hospital and a CT scan revealed a brain tumour.”

 

The Journey

brain cancer survivor sharing her journey
“Thankfully there was a full resection in March of 2017 but then we learned it had been a grade three ependymoma. Six weeks later we were in Florida for proton radiation. Luckily Ava recovered from surgery and radiation really easily. We noticed that she tired a lot easier and her short term memory has been affected but she was a trooper and really to this day, she doesn’t really understand how serious the situation was. We had a scare a year later in March of 2018 when a spot showed up on her MRI. It was too small to operate right away and we decided to put her on a therapeutic ketogenic diet even though our oncologists discouraged it. In April they called the tumour stable and then in June and again in September they could no longer see the spot. Our doctors say it must not have been a tumour, and maybe it wasn’t but the early evidence supporting keto and low carb is compelling enough for us to stick to this way of eating. We feel best knowing we are giving Ava every advantage possible.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“As a caregiver, nothing matters more to me than keeping Ava healthy and happy.”

 

Biggest hindrance

brain cancer survivor sharing your message
“I have been frustrated with the lack of support for the ketogenic diet. Children have been using it for epilepsy for almost 100 years but people are afraid to touch it with kids and cancer. Luckily I was introduced to the Maxlove Project and have received incredible support from them and their Facebook support group.”

 

Message to other Fighters

brain cancer survivor message to other cancer patients
“There is nothing scarier to a parent than having to imagine a future without your child. It’s ok to let the fear in. It’s ok to have bad days. But don’t forget to live. To fill each day with happiness. We appreciate our children in an entirely new way and there is beauty in that. The stress and anxiety will always be there so find tools to help you manage. I am grateful a counsellor got me into meditation and breathing exercises.”

Meningioma Survivor Becomes A Fitness And Health Coach

Angel Faulk Meningioma Survivor
“Do what you CAN do!”
Angel Faulk was diagnosed with meningioma – a type of brain tumor. But despite all the odds, she battled cancer and came out as a winner. She is now a fitness and health coach.

 

The Diagnosis

“I lost my hearing and after 3 years I finally got the diagnosis of a meningioma on the brain stem. This was a benign 🧠 Tumor, but treated like cancer because of location.”

 

The Journey

Angel Faulk Meningioma Survivor journey
“I was a very strong fitness instructor, never sick, so I was shocked to discover I had a brain tumor in the worse possible location. After a 14-hour long surgery I looked like scary monster. The tumor had crushed my auditory nerve and severely stretched my facial nerve. I lost the ability to smile or move the right side of my face. I had to relearn to walk, talk, swallow. They told me it may be 1 1/2 years until I teach fitness classes again. But I was in the gym after 6 weeks and teaching Zumba, Spinning, Weights classes after 12 weeks! I never got my hearing or facial nerve back, but after facial therapy there was improvement. All was going well until a year later; I had an MRI at my checkup. I was devastated the tumor had grown back! I received 27 radiation treatments. I lost my hair, had horrible spots on my face, was told I could lose my teeth. The worse part was having fever and chills for two weeks, losing 15 pounds, thinking I was dying. My children were in elementary and middle school. And the hardest part was missing out on their special activities and memories. I’ll never forget my son saying, “at least we know it’s working.” My daughter developed an eating disorder and I was driving her to counselling too! I don’t know how I did it, but a Mom will do anything for her kiddos. It was after that when I started looked more into nutrition and supplements. I learned that I needed more antioxidants, less processed foods. That is how my ministry “the fitness angel” started. I began helping others get fit and healthy at the cellular level.”

 

Motivation to fight cancer

“My children, Lydia and Ethan.”

 

Biggest hindrances

“I can’t think of any. I always knew I would get through this with God’s help.”

 

Message to other cancer fighters

Angel Faulk Message to other cancer fighters
“Let family and friends help you, listen to inspirational music, read uplifting books, pray and meditate on God’s promises. Eat healing foods and get the best nutrition possible!”

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